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Old 11-16-2007, 01:59 PM
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Thumbs up Moss Bros WIN again at the Baja 1000

out of 9 Class 3 enteries two finished within the time limit.

Moss wins by approximitly 1 hour & 6 Minutes.

CLASS 3 (Short Wheelbase 4X4)—1. Donald Moss, Sacramento, Calif./Kenneth Moss, Marysville, Calif./David Grundman, Elk Grove, Calif./Gary Dunn, Bakersfield, Calif., Ford Bronco, 40:41:38 (31.89mph); 2. Dylan Evans, Corona, Calif./Steve Krieger, Santa Ana, Calif./Damien Skutt, Riverside, Calif./Kreg Donahoe, Corona,Calif., Toyota FJ Cruiser, 41:47:12 (9 Starters; 2 Finishers)
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got the wood

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Old 11-18-2007, 07:14 PM
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& heres my Moss bros Pics from the '07 Baja 1000.
Their new Shirts



Heres that Sticker palace that still has my '05 TWW/MOSS steeeeker.



There they are.




Don Moss.



& being my chase duties were stationary. I only got these Pics as they raced by.



Now wait a minute that cant be them their lights are much too bright!





Oh wait a Minute, Thats right they're now sponsored by KC lights!






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got the wood

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Old 11-18-2007, 10:38 PM
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Cool pics and great finish guys!


That light rack looks cool on a 78-79 bronco
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Old 11-30-2007, 04:06 PM
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Press release from DON MOSS!

Moss Brothers Racing 2007 Baja 1000



The 2007 Baja 1000 was the 40th anniversary for the event, and SCORE set up an extra long 1296 mile course that started in Ensenada and finished in Cabo San Lucas.

The preparations on the Moss Brothers Racing Bronco had started right after the Primm 300 race in September, but the big news for this race was a fully sponsored deal from KC Hilights for HID lights for the Bronco, and halogen lights and light bars for the chase trucks! We have been scrounging lights for the last 8 years to mount on the Bronco, and had worked our way up to a couple of home built Hella HID lights, but we were still getting comments from people in the pits when we would pull in and they would say, “What is wrong with your lights?”. Well no more, we now have ten 8” HID lights on the truck now! The problem was that we had received them less than 2 weeks before the race, and we had to build two custom light bars and modify the wiring to operate them. Thanks to Chris Reilly who fabricated the new bars, after a couple hundred e-mails and numerous CAD drawings and a whole lot of measuring! The light bars worked perfectly, and really changed the look of the truck.

In addition, we powder coated the new light bars, the radius arms, as well as the front and rear bumpers. West Coast Broncos had sent us a new set of radius arms, and River City Differential had set us up with a new alloy axle to replace the one that we had bent in the Vegas to Reno race in August.

We got on the road, headed for Mexico on Sunday, November 11. Of course this meant we missed most of the festivities that had already started, and it also meant that we would not get a chance to pre-run any of the course. We drove straight through to Ensenada from Sacramento, and arrived during a pretty good rain storm. Monday was bright and sunny though for contingency and the tech inspection. We lined up about 9:30, and finished about 4 pm! That makes for a long day. We did get a chance to talk to a lot of people and take a look at a lot of vehicles. There were 9 entries in Class 3 this year, matching the number we had in 2000, an excellent turnout. The Pike’s from Baker, had built a new truck based on a Dodge Ramcharger, and this was a very serious looking race truck. In addition there were three early Broncos, a Range Rover, a Cherokee, the Evans FJ Toyota, and the Raffo Blazer.

Race day was Tuesday, and we had calculated that we would start at approximately 12:45 with the record number of overall entries. There were no Wal Mart grand openings this year to compete with, so the process of getting to the starting area through a snarled traffic jam in Ensenada seemed easier than in races past. Maybe we are just getting used to it? Dan Thunborg was scheduled to start with me, and we pulled up next to Chris Raffo, and had a chance to meet his son Pete who was starting with him. His satellite phones arrived at about the same time, after a special delivery from a kitchen table in the central valley of California.

Just prior to the start of the race, Dave Crosson asked if he could tape his digital movie camera to the light bar. I said “OK, but didn’t you just buy that camera like three days ago?” He said yes, but wanted to see what would happen. So the duct tape came out and the camera went on. We ended up with nearly 3 hours of digital video.

We started 5th off the line at 12:38. The rain had filled the wash with water, but the mayor of Ensenada can really get things done, and the course off the start was in excellent shape. There was one slimy spot that we got into and nearly looped the truck, all caught on the video of course. We caught and passed the Range Rover before we left the wash. As we made the turn onto Ave Ruiz, which is the last street heading out of town, I could see the Raffo Blazer catching up to us quickly in the rear view mirror. He was nearly on us, when a huge cloud of blue smoke began following him, and he quickly pulled over. I am curious to hear what that was all about, because we never saw him again but he did continue in the race. We caught the Pike Ramcharger at the end of the pavement and passed him shortly after. We caught the Wright Bronco a few miles later and passed him. This section is typically very dusty and has some silt sections, however the rain had settled things down a lot. There was still an appreciable amount of dust, but no one was stuck. I believe there were 3 Class 9 cars that started in front of us, and we passed them all in that first few miles. We could then see the Maine Cherokee ahead and we began to follow him. They had talked to us at contingency, as this was their very first off road race. Of course their truck was brand new as well. They had mentioned that they had done a lot of circle track racing in Oregon, and that was evident! We finally caught and passed them just before the first highway section at race mile 15, so now we were in the lead and starting to catch the various stock class entries that start in front of us. This race we had installed two horns to use while passing. I could hear the backup horn had already stopped working, and the primary quit soon after, so we went the next 1250 miles without one.

The silt in the RM 50 to 55 section is legendary, and we saw our share of dust and carnage in the June race in this section. The rain just 2 days before had made all the difference in the world. You could have driven a Cadillac through there with ease. We saw Rick, one of our C3R buddies from the Livermore area in this section, his Bronco safely up away from the course. Glenn Long and crew had been shadowing us in this section, and we saw them once again on the highway section. Nice to hear a friendly voice out there, as the rest of the crew was steaming south towards San Quintin. He mentioned something about a helicopter crash, as well as some problems on the course. Glenn met us again at the BFG Pit 1, RM 121, before he headed back towards Ensenada and then home. At the BFG pit, we did another one of those granola bar and Red Bull under-the-helmet tricks, got a full load of fuel, and were on our way.

As soon as we made the turn onto the road to Mike’s Sky Ranch, we could see emergency lights just ahead in the road. It turns out this was the helicopter crash, which had occurred right on the road. There were some power lines involved, however this story was only just started! You will have to read about that elsewhere. They had us detour around through the fence and we were on our way. You can always depend on lots of spectator traffic on this road, coming and going, and we were not disappointed. Web Wheeler Cam was stationed at Mike’s Sky Ranch, and we had been in radio contact with him. He was hiding behind a camera near the creek crossing, and Dan and I never saw him!

It was starting to get dark now, so we had some of the lights on. Even though we have twice as many lights now, and probably 6 times as much light, the HID systems only use 35 watts per light. This is roughly the same power loading as we had with the old system. We never had an electrical system problem for the entire race, and the KC lights were flawless. This is the first time we have had lights on the top of the truck, and we had been concerned about glare. We learned instead that alignment of the lower lights is the key, and they had to be adjusted lower later in the race to work in the dust.

Dan and I arrived at the BFG Pit 2, RM 177, with a pretty good lead, but there were several entries in the class running well. Ken and Dennis Dunn got in to run what we had heard was the toughest section of the entire race. They had had deep ditches to deal with in the dark. These are ditches dug by the military to discourage drug smuggling airplanes from landing on remote air strips.

We had drilled into all the drivers and crew that we would be racing our own race, regardless of whether it was fast or slow, and regardless of what the other entries were doing. Our biggest competitor was the time limit and check point closing times. This has served us well in the past and it turns out it did this time as well.

At the BFG Pit 3, RM 321, on the highway in Catavina, for the first time in Moss Brothers Racing history, someone other than Ken or I got in to drive. Dave Grundman made his driving debut with Gary Dunn co-driving. They had the long highway section to do south of Catavina, and then the detour out to Coco’s Corner and the infamous Calamajue wash. We had heard the wash was full of water, but Dave and Gary had no problems whatsoever, and met up with us just south of El Crucero. Ken and Dennis had complained of looseness in the front end in the prior section, and Dave had the same comments. We found that the panard, or track bar, was loose at the axle, so we pulled in and tightened it at each pit there after. Don Crosson and I got in for the run through the Bay of LA. This was Don’s first ride in the truck, and I saw his dad throw the digital camera in with him just before we took off. We typically hit this section at midnight, but since SCORE had added an extra 140 miles in the upper section of the course, we started at about 4 in the morning. Don and I got to see the sun come up as we passed through the amazing cactus forest. Truly a spectacular part of the race for us both. This section typically holds the dust on the course from racers in front of us, and of course there were vehicles in front of us. We had been catching and passing the slower Baja Challenge cars, and I could tell there was another in front of us as we began catching dust. On a tight right hand turn, I got a little to close to the right side bank and smacked a loose rock that I never saw with the right front tire. After about a quarter mile, it was apparent that the tire was losing air, so we looked for a place to pull off. Don and I worked well together and had the thing changed in a few minutes, even with the balky jack. The Hi Lift jack rides in the back of the truck and typically gets coated with a heavy layer of dried mud. Anyone that has ever used a Hi Lift jack knows that caked mud and the Hi Lift jack mechanism do not mix well. Since it was light, and easy to see what was going on, I was able to work the pins manually, and it went pretty quickly. This is the first BFG tire I have changed on the course myself during a race since the 2000 race! That’s 8 years without changing a flat, not a bad record!

Don and I continued on, and since it was light, he began taking digital videos of our progress. Since the camera was in his hand, it’s a little shaky, but he has shots of everything he could reach from that seat. He got out the front, out the back, the gauges, the GPS, and even me. We also had some fog in this section, and eventually caught and passed the Baja Challenge car that we had been following when we got the flat. The fog is so bad that you can’t wipe it off the visor fast enough, and have to run with the visor open. The new upper light bar served as a collection funnel that caught the fog, and then dripped it down on us.

Somewhere along the trip south, one of the chase trucks came across the torso of a swimsuit model mannequin, and “rescued” her. She was promptly named Kay Cee in honor of our new sponsor. All I can say is WTF?

We pulled into the BFG pit 5, RM 517, (we are now just over half way!) on the long highway section just north of San Ignacio where Ken and Craig Laws got into the truck. Everything on the truck looked good, for what was supposed to be the longest and most remote section of the course. We had spent a large amount of time adding a second fuel cell and fill pipe system just because of this section. Out around El Datil, on the beach section, the rear ring and pinion gears exploded, snapping the ear off the driveshaft yoke in the process. Since the truck is 4-wheel-drive, it is possible to drive it on front axle drive only after removing the rear driveshaft, and we have done this in the past. It is just that the front axle is many times more fragile than the rear, and much harder to repair, so you try to limit the time doing this. Ken had decided it was no big deal, and would keep going until the BFG Pit 6 at La Purisima, RM 829, however he chose to use the BFG relay to let the rest of the crew know this. Unfortunately, the message that got to the rest of the crew made absolutely no sense, partly because we were many miles from the relay on the Sea of Cortez side, and partly because the message had gone through several people. It sounded like the message was that “the truck was down and needed a rear driveline”. Since they had the only spare driveline on the truck, and the truck was capable of moving on the front axle, the message made no sense to the chase crew. All of the chase vehicles pulled over at Olivia’s (Buena Ventura), south of Mulege to try and sort it out. The BFG relay would not answer us back, but Dave finally decided to try the Weatherman relay. By some miracle, they were not in the middle of an emergency, and took the call right away. Our message to Ken was to stop the truck and whatever they were doing and call us on the Satellite phone. This was done, and it was at that time that we finally learned that they were indeed still moving, but needed the spare set of gears, and would meet a crew at the BFG pit 7, RM 829, in La Purisima. The down side to this was that we were over 3 hours of driving time away from that location with the parts. We got the parts transferred to Dave’s truck and he took off with Gary, while Ken and Craig removed the old parts and prepared for the installation of the new parts. This allowed us to keep our scheduled driver and co-rider changes, however Dave and Gary would not get a lot of time to sleep. Once I got home, the ring gear looks fine (for what it’s been through!), but all the teeth on the pinion gear in one little section are gone, never seen one fail this way.

During this whole episode, we were getting sporadic text messages from Chris Reilly who was tracking several of the racers in our class over several different sources on his computer in Reno. In addition, Pete in Iowa, and Rob in San Clemente were doing the same and routing info to Chris as well. We knew the Toyota had been down for some time at around race mile 200, but was moving again. They had also seen the Bronco when it stopped at El Datil. Of course at about the same time, the tracking device we were using timed out, and stopped sending position information to the internet. The tracker has to be reset every 24 hours. The rest of the chase caravan had moved to the next scheduled stop at RM 875, on the highway above Loreto. We were able to get a little sleep, and watch some other teams deal with problems on their vehicles, and met up with Ken Leavitt from the Anger Issues team. Instead of racing, he and his team had come down to pre-run, camp, fish and pit for another group of racers in several different classes. He offered any assistance he could, just like a 100 other people do for other racers down there. It doesn’t matter what team you are on, everyone’s goal is to get all the racers to the finish.

We watched the Toyota go by, and about the same time got the word from Dave that Ken and Craig were on their way. About an hour and 45 minutes later, Cliff and I climbed in the Bronco and headed out from RM 875. It was now dark again, and I had recalled Ken mentioning this section coming up was “kind of nasty” last year. What an understatement! There were some enormous silt traps in here, the kind with thick bushes on both sides, or maybe a barbed wire fence on one side, thick brush on the other. There were cars stuck all over the place and heavy, heavy dust. They had not received the rain that the northern part of Baja had a couple days prior, so it was dry, dry, dry! When the dust was really bad, I would just try to pull over and wait for it to settle. I really did not want to plow into another stuck racer, or blast into a bottomless silt pit when I could have picked a line around it. Sometimes this meant that another vehicle would sneak by us, and then we had to wait for their dust to settle. This turned out to be the best strategy, and we made it through just fine. We even pulled up next to a Dodge truck sitting in the middle of the trail, thinking he might have been doing the same, waiting for traffic to clear. When we got up next to the door, the driver was not even in the truck! His co-rider was still strapped in, and gave the hand motions that they might like to have a tow. Sorry guy, no tow strap, and you aren’t even out to help? Not going to happen!

Going out of Loreto, there are some steep climbing switchbacks, and then the road goes over the top and down into a canyon on the other side. Last year, this canyon had 30 or 40 rough water crossings, with deep water at each one. This year, the crossings had been repaired, and the water was just a trickle, so it went easily. Cliff and I pulled into BFG pit 8, RM 978, where Dave and Gary jumped in. Dave and Gary had an amazing run over the next 120+ miles, averaging nearly 52 miles per hour (according to the BFG info), and actually caught and started dicing with the Toyota. They also had a tough whoops section that I had done several times before, and did not miss! As they were about to pull into the BFG pit 9, RM 1106, they reported that they might need to change the panard bar, as the right coil over spring was hitting the frame. I believe the panard bar had been damaged all the way back in the Bay of LA section when I had hit the rock, but had been gradually getting worse. When Ken took a look at it, he decided that it was not that bad, and that it was not worth the time to change it. He and Jerry Ornellas jumped in for the next section. Somewhere in this section they found a silt hill, and actually got the Bronco stuck. An enterprising local farmer just happened to have his tractor in place, and $20 later; Ken and Jerry were on their way. The Toyota apparently got by somewhere in this section again, and the race was on again, with less than 150 miles to go! Ken and Jerry continued on, sticking to the game plan of running our own pace, and continued south. At the road crossing at Todos Santos, the Bronco and the Toyota were only minutes apart, however our crew parked at the road crossing reported that Toyota was missing and coughing severely. They had apparently picked up some trash in their fuel, and it had plugged the inlet in the fuel tank. They had to pull it apart and clean it before continuing on. We had planned on another rider change at the road crossing, but Michelle Read decided it was too close a race to risk the stop, and told the crew to continue on.

The Bronco pulled into the finish, at about 5:30 in the morning, with an elapsed time of 40 hours, 41 minutes, and 37 seconds over 1296.39 miles, with an average speed of 31.857 mph. Not any kind of record, but certainly not bad considering all the lost time waiting for parts. Needless to say, the finish line was nearly empty, Sal Fish was not there, and we didn’t even get our BFG Winners hats! We later heard that the Atkinson BC Bronco made it nearly 1100 miles, the Raffo Blazer made it about 800 miles, and the Maine Cherokee made it about 900 miles, all timing out on the course. The Pike Ramcharger was on the scene of a wild wreck involving a class 8 truck that rolled off a cliff, and they ended their race helping with the recovery. Thankfully (and miraculously) the two guys in the truck that went off were not seriously hurt, although one was flown to the hospital in San Diego. With no other entries finishing, the class had a pretty low finishing rate. Given more time, we would have had some more make it.

We did get some great finish line and podium photos, and then waited for the Evans Toyota to pull in. We congratulated them on their finish with a case of Tecate Light, and got some photos with their team and their truck.

With that, we all climbed into the handiest vehicle and headed out in search of some food and our beach house, in that order. We found Mama’s breakfast place, home of the stuffed French toast, and powered down the first solid meal in a couple of days. After that, it was off to find the beach house. By this time, it was full on traffic and road construction hour, and the house is at Punta Gorda, some 20 or 30 miles away, so it took a little while to find, but well worth the search! Thanks to Dave Grundman for arranging this one. The place is right on a quiet beach, with water that was in the 70’s or 80’s, all self-contained with a solar electric system. The rest of the day consisted of showers, sleep, and then dinner at Buzzard’s which is just down the road. Friday was the awards ceremony back in Cabo, but first we did a little exploring, and found the beach a little farther east was open to riding and wheeling. After airing down the tires on the Bronco, we ran through another tank of fuel running up and down the beach giving rides, before shutting down for apparently dusting some of the neighbor’s solar cells. (Whoops!)

With the conclusion of a very long and drawn out awards ceremony, we all picked up and headed off to find some dinner. After wandering the streets of Cabo for some time, we decided on the Giggling Marlin, and as we are waiting for the table, the Donahoe/Evans team pulls in. So heck, let’s get a table for 30! I had a chance to sit by Bob Bowers and his wife and listened to a few of their stories, great people to know. Bob had been a co-rider in the Toyota on the way down, something he is long time veteran of. After dinner, a few drinks and some questionable photos, a couple of the single guys have decided that their mission for 2008 will be to lure Sera from the Donahoe team over to the Moss Brothers team. After sticking KC stickers to just about everything that did or did not move, we moved on to El Squid Roe, and more KC stickers. From there it was one more night of sleep, and then we had to do that 1300 miles backwards!

Michelle and Jerry had arranged flights from the Cabo airport, so they were dropped off on the way out. We took highway 1 north from San Jose del Cabo, for something different, and it was quite a drive. The road is a little narrow and windy for trailer towing, but very pretty. The hills are covered with thick green brush and big cactus, with large and colorful mountains.

We pulled into Olivia’s, south of Mulege, in time for dinner, and found several racers and the Dusty Times crew there already eating. I was able to relay my story to Judy Smith, but we left too early the next morning to get our BFG hats. We just threw our sleeping bags out on the beach, and I think Dave mentioned that it should be against the law to stay inside and not be out there to see the stars, with the water just a few feet away.

From there we were able to make it all the way back to the house in Ensenada, finishing up with a dinner in El Bufadora. We stopped on the way, for a couple of broken down vehicles. One needed fuel, and we were able to send them back to a guy that was selling some at the Bay of LA turn off. Another couple from Ensenada had broken down and needed a ride back to El Rosario, and since we still had a couple of open seats, we were able to help them out. They were very pleasant and she spoke very good English, and had a lot of questions about the racing.

Kay Cee had been strapped into the driver’s seat of the Bronco for the trip north. It was interesting to note the reaction of the various 18 year old inspectors at the numerous military checkpoints on the highway. I could not talk any of them into adopting her, they would have much preferred to have the Camelback drinking systems we have in the Bronco. Kay Cee decided to stay on at the beach house in Ensenada, and we wish her well in all her future endeavors.

Monday morning it was back on the road again for the final leg of the trip, a full 8 days after we started. The border still took a couple of hours to negotiate, but there were no major problems. With all the trouble many other crews had, we were fortunate to have had no problems at all. 20 people, 6 chase trucks, a trailer and a race vehicle, about 15,000 combined miles driven on Baja’s skinny highways, and no stolen items, no cleaned off mirrors, or even a single speeding ticket.

After a quick breakfast/lunch of good old Denny’s food in Chula Vista, the various chase trucks split up for the rest of the trip. Eric McGill was dropped off at the airport in San Diego for the plane ride back to Texas. The Canadians, Don, Dave, and Jake had a little shopping to do on the way back, and took another couple of days getting back as far as Sacramento. They made excellent time driving without traffic all Thanksgiving day, going from Sacramento to the border in about 15 hours. They saved their border drama for a 12 hour delay at the Canadian border. Turns out the red tape involved getting some of the items they had purchased in California across the border slowed them way down, requiring a storage unit and another night spent sleeping in the Yukon Express on the eve of Black Friday.

I just wanted to give a huge thanks to everyone involved. It takes a team of many, many people to make this happen. There are the 20 people that we took across the border, and thankfully they were careful and they all made it back safely once again. There are the many sponsors, including KC Highlights, BF Goodrich tires, American Racing ATX Wheels, River City Differential, West Coast Broncos, Deaver Suspension, King Shocks, and Bronco Driver Magazine. A big thanks to Class3Racing.com and Web Wheeler Cam for promoting the class and helping to increase the number of entries. Michelle Read for writing the press releases and working with KC for nearly a year to put together the lighting sponsorship. All of those that helped with the preparations of the truck before we left Sacramento. Chris Reilly for putting together the light bars in record time and then staying up all night to monitor the computer and send us updates from home. Rob Jones for covering the BFG meeting in San Diego the week before the race, and all the families that took up the slack at home while we ran off to Mexico to take on and conquer one of the most challenging races in the world. Thank you all!

Don
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:02 PM
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Post 1000 press release

WE FINISHED, WE WON THE RACE, WE LOST THE CHAMPIONSHIP


Sacramento, CA –For the first time since the 2000 Baja 1000, SCORE Class 3 had a record tying nine entries. SCORE had 424 entries start the historic 40th annual SCORE Baja 1000 race and 239 (or 56%) finished in the time allotted. The Moss Brothers entered their undefeated ‘79 Black Ford Bronco and gathered their 25th class win and sixth SCORE Baja 1000 Class 3 victory. The near 1300 mile race across the Baja Mexico peninsula came down to two vehicles in Class 3 and after 40 hours they were still dueling at the finish. The Moss Brothers crossed the finish line first at 40 hours, 41 minutes and an average speed of 31.85 miles per hour, just an hour ahead of their competition.

With a crew of 20, the Moss Brothers headed to Baja intent on finishing the grueling course and hopefully securing a sixth class championship. Even though the Moss Brothers have won three of the five races in the series, the Donahoe/Evans team was able to steal the championship by virtue of entering and starting one more race. It all came down to the last few miles of the last race of the year and both teams relished in the challenge. Don Moss had nine driver/co-driver changes scheduled along the course to keep everyone fresh. One driver and three co-drivers were rookies in SCORE competition. “The silt in the race mile 50 to 55 section is legendary, and we saw our share of dust and carnage in the June race in this section. The rain just 2 days before had made all the difference in the world!” Don Moss continues, “You could have driven a Cadillac through there with ease!” Whether by chance or planning, rookie driver and Crew Chief, Dave Grundman recorded the fastest segment speeds for the team, at 56 and 47 miles per hour average. Although flats are exceedingly rare on the Moss Bronco, all have happened while Ken Moss was driving – until now. In the upper half of the course, Don Moss reported, “This is the first BFG tire I have changed on the course myself during a race since the 2000 race! That’s 8 years without changing a flat, not a bad record!” The Black Bronco crew had their share of adversity when they were challenged to get to the Bronco near El Datil (on the beach) at race mile 800. The rear ring and pinion gears on the Bronco had exploded, snapping the ear off the driveshaft yoke in the longest, most remote section of the course. Ken Moss limped the Bronco into the next BFG pit where the crew met them and made the repairs. During the down time, the Moss Brothers lost the lead. It took the team another 200 miles to get it back and once they had it, they never looked back.

This year, with the team’s start and finish times, the greatest percentage of the race was run in the dark. That would’ve been a huge handicap had the team not secured their new sponsor – KC HiLiTES, just prior to this race and were equipped with a full set of HID lights. KC’s HID lights were a huge improvement over the hand-me-down halogens the team was previously running.

Moss Brothers Racing once again thanks all their sponsors for their continued support – BF Goodrich tires, American Racing ATX Wheels, River City Differential, West Coast Broncos, Deaver Suspension, King Shocks, and Bronco Driver Magazine. A big thanks to Class3Racing.com and Web Wheeler Cam for promoting the class and helping to increase the number of entries.

Television coverage of this year’s SCORE Baja 1000 will air on NBC Sports as a one hour special on December 30 at 3 pm ET. The Outdoor Channel will also be airing coverage of the race. Check on line at www.thebajaunlimited.com for the latest television updates.


Contact: Michelle Read
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